Free Credit Score: Get Your Credit Score in Canada 2017


How to Get Your Free Credit Score in Canada

 

We’ve all probably heard of them before, but have you ever actually seen your credit score before?  Want to know how to get your free credit score?  I’ll show you how in today’s post!

 

Your credit score is important — it basically dictates what financial products lenders will offer you.  Not only that, it will determine the interest rates you pay on money you borrow.  Obviously, you want your score to be accurate and as high as possible.  So it makes sense to keep an eye on it.

 

It’s possible to get your credit report directly from the credit bureaus who provide them, however this will cost you.  Here at RateSense.ca, we don’t like paying fees if there’s a way to get around them.  I’m telling you that you can get your free credit score!

 

Below are a few methods you can use to obtain your free credit score in Canada:

 

 

  1.   Ask for a free copy from the credit bureaus

This is a possibility, but the credit bureaus don’t want you to know about it.  The option is often hard to find on their websites.  What’s more, obtaining your free credit score from the credit bureau will only result in the report being sent by mail.  Meaning, you’ll have to wait a few days to review it.  Waiting is never fun, so this method is probably not the best for most people.  Still, if you’re especially paranoid about providing personal details online, even in secure environments, this might be for you.

EquiFax’s mail-in request form is here:  Equifax

Visit TransUnion’s website here: TransUnion

 

 

2. Borrowell

Here’s a site that let’s you get your free credit score online.  No waiting for the mailman to deliver it to your house.  The interface itself is user-friendly and straightforward, too.  The one drawback to Borrowell is it’s not available in every province (sorry Quebec, Saskatchewan, and Territories!), so make sure your’s is eligible!  While it’s free, Borrowell will send you communications with finance tips and offers of their products and services.  In our opinion though, it’s a small price to pay for a free credit score!

Visit Borrowell’s free credit score application here: Borrowell — Free Credit Score

 

 

3. Mogo

This site is very similar to Borrowell, and offer you a tool to obtain your free credit score.  Like the previous method, you sign up and agree to receive communications of Mogo’s products but are under no obligation to use them.  Once you’ve created your account, you’ll be able to see your free credit score.  Mogo updates your score each month as opposed to every 3 months, which is a plus.  This method isn’t available in all provinces, although they seem to be expanding quite rapidly.  I wasn’t able to use it ultimately because Quebec wasn’t eligible.

Check your credit score with Mogo for free here: Mogo — Free Credit Score

 

 

4. RateHub.ca

If you really want to have instant access to your free credit score, but like me were limited by the province you reside in, this was the only option I was able to find online that allowed me to check it, even in Quebec!  It has an easy to use dashboard interface, and like all the other methods mentioned previously is completely free to register and use!  Another thing I liked about this method is RateHub recommended me credit card deals that I was eligible for based on my actual credit score.

Review your credit report for free using RateHub here: RateHub.ca — Free Credit Score

 

 

 

Once you get your free credit score using one of the above methods, you’ll be able to review your report to make sure there are no errors.  If there are, you’ll be able to contact the applicable creditor to make any corrections.  The most important part of the report, however, is your credit score.  This 3-digit number ranges from 300 (considered a poor score) to 900 (an excellent score), and like I mentioned previously will determine the rates lenders lend to you, if they even decide to lend anything at all.

 

I’m planning to write more about credit scores in the near future, including the factors that impact the score you receive.  Have you gotten your free credit score yet?  Which method did you use to obtain it?  Did you notice any errors on the report?  Leave a reply in the comments below to share your experience!

 


 

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